Tags - audio

A good message is like an arrow that hits the bullseye. But remember that in an interview, there’s only so much time and thus only so many arrows you can loose off. There’s always a clock ticking away, whehter it’s in a studio because airtime is running out or in front of an audience because attention is going down.

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What you say is only the tip of the iceberg. Whatever you say, there will always be something resonating, something that is mightier than words, and that is your relationship to your audience. And like all relationships, this one, too, is about emotions. It’s emotions that let us engage our audience – or conversely, that can turn our audience off.
If all we focus on is the facts we report, then all we’re focusing on is the tip of the iceberg, and that means we might be heading for a shipwreck. So think first about your audience’s state of mind. What are they expecting of you? What are they wishing for? What are they fearing?

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Media richness has become something of a buzzword, and that’s no coincidence, because what media richness means is making a message as personal as possible, whether it’s an one-on-one conversation, a department meeting, a speech before an all-hands gathering or at a management conference, but also a TV interview or your video message on the internet, meaning the media that is becoming more and more important by the day. The question is, how do you make sure you reach people personally?

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Do you get stage fright before going to face an audience? Then you’re in good company. A little stage fright is no bad thing, because it’ll help you concentrate. But too much stage fright can paralyse you, and then you need to react. Here’s a little rescue package.

First, take your time to prepare for your moment on stage. An hour’s rest would be ideal. You could go for a walk in the fresh air, put all other issues to one side and put the finishing touches on what you are about to say.

Loosen up physically. There’s lots of things you can do for that without breaking in a sweat: Bounce up and down lightly, roll on your feet from your heels to your toes, rotate your arms in big circles, or gently stretch your head and neck muscles to relax them.

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Crises are neither good nor bad. The true sense of the word is that it is a decision situation. Best to view it as an opportunity. When your organization becomes caught up in a crisis, you’ll need good communications skills and above all – empathy.

Three sure-fire ways to make a crisis worse is stonewalling, salami tactics and passing the parcel.

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Your words are just the tip of the iceberg. What you say is only a very small part of what you put across when you speak with someone. Your words address the facts or what’s known as the content level. But what counts a lot more is the relationship level, meaning the emotional side. Most people pay a lot more attention to how you look and how your voice sounds than to what you are saying. So don’t just focus on what you say, but also on how you say it. Don’t just talk to the camera, imagine an audience behind it. Who are you talking to? Why are they listening? What keeps them awake at night? What are they hoping for? And conversely, what would you like to get them to do?

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Suppose your company faces fundamental change. What do you do? Best to go bevor you people or before a camera and take a personal stand. Show them you believe in what the company is about to do, but also show them you care about your people and that you value them. Above all: Be present as a human being. When people hear about changes coming, they can become emotional, often scared. That’s nothing special. Most of us dislike change. Then again, most of us will accept change if we think we are up to it.

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You know the three-second rule, the one that says that it takes all of three seconds for us to decide whether we like or dislike someone we just met. Well, that rule applies to the camera, too. So be positive. Make sure you get the good news out first. Of course, that’s going to take some preparation. Never try to improvise good news! On camera, that’s a recipe for disaster. Take care to decide what is your most important piece of news. Then, formulate it, and make sure your tone is positive.

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Hello, my name is Adrian Dunskus, and I’m a media coach. I’d like to help you get across your important corporate messages, especially when they’re about change. You’ll find it easiest, the more authentic you are, and that, in turn, depends on your emotional presence. I can help you be emotionally present even if it’s in front of a camera, and do so calling on your own emotions. I can show you where to reach inside yourself to tap into these emotions. To do that, we’ll first find out what sort of communicative personality you are, and where your emotional strengths and weaknesses lie, where there might be blocks that prevent them from getting through to your audience.

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